BE AWARE OF HEATSTROKE

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BE AWARE OF HEATSTROKE

BE AWARE OF HEATSTROKE

     With the onset of summer season and the expected high temperature, Heatstroke is a usual occurrence which causes death.

     However, Heatstroke is predictable and preventable.  Thus, the KB Bicol Website, as a public safety reminder is publishing this article taken from the Mayo Clinic, a non-profit organization.

SYMPTON

Heatstroke symptoms include:
  HIGH BODY TEMPERATURE. A body temperature of 104 F (40 C) or higher is the main sign of heatstroke.
  LACK OF SWEATING. In heatstroke brought on by hot weather, your skin will feel hot and dry to the touch. However, in heatstroke brought on by strenuous exercise, your skin may feel moist.
  NAUSEA AND VOMITING. You may feel sick to your stomach or vomit.
  FLUSHED SKIN. Your skin may turn red as your body temperature increases.
  RAPID BREATHING. Your breathing may become rapid and shallow.
  RACING HEART RATE. Your pulse may significantly increase because heat stress places a tremendous burden on your heart to help cool your body.
  HEADACHE. You may experience a throbbing headache.
  CONFUSION. You may have seizures, hallucinate, or have difficulty speaking or understanding what others are saying.
  UNCONSCIOUSNESS. You may pass out or fall into a state of deep unconsciousness (coma).
  MUSCLE CRAMPS OR WEAKNESS. Your muscles may feel tender or cramped in the early stages of heatstroke, but may later go rigid or limp.
Heatstroke follows two less serious heat-related conditions:
  HEAT CRAMPS. Heat cramps are caused by initial exposure to high temperatures or physical exertion. Signs and symptoms of heat cramps usually include excess sweating, fatigue, thirst and cramps, usually in the stomach, arms or legs. This condition is common in very hot weather or with moderate to heavy physical activity. You can usually treat heat cramps by drinking water or fluids containing electrolytes (Gatorade or other sports drinks), resting and getting to a cool spot, like a shaded or air-conditioned area.
  HEAT EXHAUSTION. Heat exhaustion occurs when you don't act on the signs and symptoms of heat cramps and your condition worsens. Signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion include a headache, dizziness or lightheadedness, nausea, skin that feels cool and moist, and muscle cramps. Often with heat exhaustion, you can treat the condition yourself by following the same measures used to treat heat cramps, such as drinking cool, nonalcoholic beverages, getting into an air-conditioned area or taking a cool shower. If your symptoms persist, seek medical attention immediately.

WHEN TO SEE A DOCTOR

     If you think a person may be experiencing heatstroke, seek immediate medical help. Call 911 or your local emergency services number.  Take immediate action to cool the overheated person while waiting for emergency treatment.

Help the person move to a shaded location and remove excess clothing.

Place ice packs or cold, wet towels on the person's head, neck, armpits and groin.

Mist the person with water while a fan is blowing on him or her.

CAUSES

Heatstroke can occur in these ways:

Exposure to a hot environment. In a type of heatstroke called nonexertional heatstroke, your condition is caused by a hot environment that leads to a rise in body temperature, without strenuous physical activity. This type of heatstroke typically occurs in hot, humid weather, especially for prolonged periods. It occurs most often in older adults and in people with chronic illness.

Strenuous activity. In a type of heatstroke called exertional heatstroke, your condition is caused by an increase in body temperature brought on by physical activity in hot weather. Anyone exercising or working in hot weather can get exertional heatstroke, but it's most likely to occur if you're not accustomed to high temperatures.

     In either type of heatstroke, your condition can be brought on by:

Wearing excess clothing that prevents your sweat from evaporating easily and cooling your body

Drinking alcohol, which can affect your body's ability to regulate your temperature

Becoming dehydrated, because you're not drinking enough water to replenish fluids you lose through perspiration

PREVENTION

     Take these steps to prevent heatstroke during hot weather:

Wear loosefitting, lightweight clothing. Wearing excess clothing or clothing that fits tightly won't allow your body to cool properly.

Wear light-colored clothing if you're in the sun. Dark clothing absorbs heat. Light-colored clothing can help keep you cool by reflecting the sun's rays.

Drink plenty of fluids. Staying hydrated will help your body sweat and maintain a normal body temperature.
* Take extra precautions with certain medications. Be on the lookout for heat-related problems if you take medications that can affect your body's ability to stay hydrated and dissipate heat.


Never leave children or anyone else in a parked car. This is a common cause of heat-related deaths in children. When parked in the sun, the temperature in your car can rise 20 degrees F (more than 6.7 C) in just 10 minutes. It's not safe to leave a person inside a parked car in hot weather for any period of time, even if the windows are cracked or the car is in the shade. When your car is parked, keep it locked to prevent a child from getting inside.

Take it easy during the hottest parts of the day. If you can't avoid strenuous activity in hot weather, follow the same precautions and rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to schedule exercise or physical labor for cooler parts of the day, such as early morning or evening. Taking breaks and replenishing your fluids during that time will help your body regulate your temperature.

Get acclimatized. Limit the amount you spend working or exercising in the heat until you're conditioned to it. People who are not used to hot weather are especially susceptible to heat-related illness, including heatstroke. It can take several weeks for your body to adjust to hot weather.

Be cautious if you're at increased risk. If you take medications or have a physical condition that increases your risk of heat-related problems, avoid the heat and act quickly if you notice symptoms of overheating. If you participate in a strenuous sporting event or activity in hot weather, make sure there are medical services at the event in case a heat emergency arises.

FOR YOUR INFORMATION (FYI)

Date entered: April 04, 2013 04:04:13
Entered by: Jennis I. Nidea
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